Summer Undergraduate Research in Engineering/Science Program

 

SURE students

The Research Environment

The Georgia Institute of Technology has an enrollment of over 20,000 and is a national leader in production of minority scientists and engineers. Students are attracted to Georgia Tech because of the quality and reputation of its degree programs. In its 2012 ranking of graduate programs, U.S. News and World Report ranked the Industrial and Systems Engineering program number one; Biomedical Engineering program is number two; the Civil Engineering program number three; Aerospace Engineering program is ranked number four; the Electrical Engineering program number five; and the Mechanical and Enviromental Engineering programs are ranked number six. In all, seven programs were ranked in the top ten.

The evidence of Georgia Tech's influence on the supply of female and minority engineers earning bachelor's degrees is unmistakable. For 2010, according to the ASEE Profiles of Engineering and Technology Colleges, Georgia Tech ranked:

  • 1st in the nation in the number of engineering B.S. degrees awarded to women
  • 2nd in the nation in the number of engineering B.S. degrees awarded to African-Americans
  • 14th in the nation in the number of engineering B.S. degrees awarded to Hispanic Americans

Furthermore, at the graduate level, for 2012, according to Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, Georgia Tech ranked:

  • 1st in the nation in the number of engineering Ph.D. degrees awarded to African-American students
  • 2nd in the nation in the number of engineering Ph.D. degrees awarded to Hispanic students
  • 2nd in the nation in the number of physical science Ph.D. degrees awarded to African American students

The College of Engineering student population consists of 9,069 undergraduates and 3,940 graduate students in eight schools, all of which offer doctoral degrees. Of these, 14% of the undergraduates and 8% of the graduate students are underrepresented minorities (i.e., African-Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Polynesian-Pacific Islanders). The College of Sciences student population is 1,271 undergraduate and 828 graduate students in seven schools. Of this, 11% of the undergraduates, and 10% of the graduate students are underrepresented minorities. The College of Computing student population is 1,119 undergraduate and 711 graduates. Of this, 13% of the undergraduates, and 5% of the graduate students are underrepresented minorities.

As an example of the research environment and facilities available to SURE participants, consider electrical engineering. Image of the Van Leer building. Georgia Tech is a leading national and international center of electronics research. The five-story, 160,000 square-foot Van Leer Building serves as the headquarters of Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. This facility houses faculty and extensive laboratories devoted to instruction and research. Current research efforts cut across the spectrum of electrical and computer engineering and include projects in computer architecture, bioengineering, control systems, digital signal processing, electrical energy, electromagnetics, electronic design, microelectronics, and optics.

In addition, the facilities available in the Microsystems Packaging Research Center (PRC), the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC), and the Microelectronics Research Center (MiRC) and Nanotechnology Research Center (NRC) also provide tremendous educational opportunities for undergraduates.

Aside from the research facilities at Georgia Tech, SURE students are also able to enjoy a very hospitable and multicultural campus environment. Because of many excellent programs, Georgia Tech has been able to attract a large number of minority graduate students. Over 70 of these students are currently enrolled in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. These graduate students are exceptional role models for SURE participants.

Seminars and Field Trips

Student communication and bonding is enhanced by several group activities. Students become better acquainted with research through weekly seminars on state-of-the-art topics, as well as visits to local industrial research centers, such as Lockheed-Martin and Cisco. The social and collegial development of the SURE participants is facilitated by group cultural outings such as trips to museums, plays, athletic events, or concerts taking place in the Atlanta area.


Last revised on October 19, 2012.